2017 BJFC Workshops

The 2017 BJFC workshops will explore how we can use our community networks and Jewish values and tradition to bring positive change to our local and regional food systems. You will leave these workshops energized with new learning and practical next-steps.

Timing subject to change, please check back as we update this information:

1:15-2:30 WORKSHOP BLOCK ONE

Demystifying Yeast *COOKING*
Fresh, active dry, instant – which to choose? Does it matter? This tiny microorganism is instrumental in turning grain into beer, cabbage into ‘kraut, and most importantly flour and water into bread. Bread is often considered the foundation of a festive meal but it can be intimidating to make it yourself. What temperature does yeast truly love, and how much sugar is enough? When can you safely add the salt? Learn the answers to all these questions and more as you participate in making bread for our conference dinner with expert baker, Chef Bettina Scemama of social enterprise Haley House Bakery Cafe.

  • Chef Bettina Scemama is fascinated by the art of baking and how it is a deeply personal expression of love and home across cultures. German by birth but growing up in Frankfurt, Beirut, London and Rio de Janeiro becoming a pastry chef was the ultimate culmination of her childhood travels. After completing her training in pastry at Peter Kump’s New York Cooking School (now the Institute for Culinary Education), she worked at various restaurants in Manhattan. When she moved to Boston six years ago she found the perfect spot to share her craft, and work for social justice at Haley House Bakery Cafe where she is in charge of new recipe development and specialty items sold to local companies. When she is not designing the latest holiday cookie, she is home raising her three boys, listening to Brazilian music and squeezing in a bit of knitting.

Creating Healthy Food Pantries                                        
Low-income individuals and families struggle to afford the nutritious foods that would alleviate and prevent chronic diseases. As a result, the nutritional profile of the food they receive at food pantries matters. Based on the literature as well as seven years of experience working with food pantries, the presenters will share policies and practices that benefit the health of food pantry participants. In addition, the presenters will share resources for people interested in making a difference through the food programs in their communities.

  • Alison Kaufman, MS, RDN, LDN believes that access to healthy foods is an essential right and the basis for a better life. She has worked with area food pantries over the past several years in order to improve health among recipients, including under a Massachusetts Department of Public Health contract, and published related research with Boston University. She established the Greater Boston Hunger Network in partnership with Project Bread and the Greater Boston Food Bank, which offers food pantry managers in 25 local towns a chance to network, learn best practices, and learn from each other. She is currently the Director of Hunger and Nutrition at Jewish Family & Children’s Service of Greater Boston.                    

Engaging Youth Through JOFEE                                       
JOFEE, or Jewish Outdoor Food, Farming, and Environmental Education, is growing all over the country. Come learn from Jewish educators about what it is like to implement JOFEE with youth from Jewish professionals who have worked at farm and nature programs in the greater Boston area. We will talk about successes and challenges of this work and learn new activities to do with kids of all ages.

  • Elizabeth Kaplan directs The Discovery Club, a new program for children ages 5-8 at the JCC of Greater Boston. Her background in experiential Jewish education comes from time as an Urban Adamah fellow in Berkeley, as well as summers spent launching a garden education program at URJ Camp Kalsman near Seattle. She has an MS in Food Policy and Applied Nutrition and a Master’s of Public Health from Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, and is currently a JOFEE fellow.
  • Laura Bellows is an educator, artist, activist, and current rabbinical student at Hebrew College. Laura studied environmental science at Oberlin College and went on to lead Teva’s Congregational and Community Programs for over six years: training educators and clergy in Jewish environmental and food education, developing curriculum, and designing programs to empower communities to live out Judaism’s environmental and food values. She authored the Boston JCRC’s Telem curriculum on Environmental Sustainability and Justice – a year-long service-based course for Boston teens.

Making Kosher Chicken – An Educational Shechita
*This session is two workshop times long, please attend both time slots and prepare to be outdoors*                 
Attendees will learn about the timeless Laws of Kosher slaughter, or Shechita, from their ancient origins to their modern day application, while respectfully witnessing Shechita of three chickens. Participants will have the opportunity to think deeply about the process of getting meat to their plate as well as to help in the process of transforming a live chicken into kosher meat ready for the Shabbat table by plucking feathers, soaking & salting. We will consider the whole course of an animal’s life and welfare.

  • Rabbi Zalman Krems is a California native and alumnus of the famed Yeshivas Techebin, Boston Kollel and the Ohr Lagolah Institute. He formerly served as the Kashrus Administrator of Oregon Kosher, Rabbi of Ahavas Torah in Eugene, Oregon, and a Rabbinic fellow of the Portland Kollel. Currently Rabbi Krems is the Executive Director of the Rabbinical Council of New England, and the head of its Kashrus department, KVH Kosher.
  • Rabbi Mayer Simcha Abramowitz is a native New Englander, born in Worcester currently living in New Haven. He is a graduate of the Rabbinical College of America, and has served as a Kosher inspector for major Kosher agencies for more than 20 years. He is a veteran second-generation shochet, with 29 years’ experience working under the most prominent rabbinical Supervisions. Rabbi Abramowitz is currently the Connecticut Region Kosher Supervisor for KVH Kosher.

Creating Farm to School Partnerships
Explore the Joy’s and Oy’s of developing a farm-to-school program. Planning and community engagement are key- and there’s no better time to start than now. Hear from a variety of perspectives in framing and implementing such a program.

  • Steven Smith has been the Director of Food Services at Gann Academy for almost two years. He has spent his professional career of over 40 years in private school food services, starting at Brandeis University. At Newton Country Day School he was able to work with the Pioneer Valley Vegetable Growers Association until they stopped selling to schools. Most recently he directed Food Services at Perkins School for the Blind where he started a Farm to School program.
  • Simca Horwitz is the Co-Director of Massachusetts Farm to School where she works with farmers, food service directors and advocates to increase local foods procurement and education at schools and other institutions. She is passionate about building a vibrant local food system and has worked for the past 13 years at a variety of food and agriculture organizations in greater Boston including three years as a vegetable farmer. Simca holds an M.S. in Food and Agriculture Policy from the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.
  • Melanie Kessler is the Executive Director of Moahdim, the educational nonprofit of Living Tree Alliance, committed to regenerating land, redefining community, and revitalizing culture. Since 2000, she has been dedicated to creating outreach events for social change programs. Using her startup spark, she has launched chavurah programs and community-based Hebrew Schools at synagogues on both coasts. Most happy covered in mud, she lives car- free, leads occasional bike tours for the Superhero Haul of Justice, co-manages a 2-acre organic educational farm, and most importantly tumbles and rumbles with her 2 and 4 year old sons.

2:45-4:00 WORKSHOP BLOCK TWO

Cochini Cooking and the 3 Cs (Curry, Coriander, and Cumin ) *COOKING*
Traverse cultural and culinary history as we explore cuisine from the Malabar coast of India, as developed by the community of Jews who landed there nearly 2000 years ago. We’ll delve into the spices that dominate the menu of these Cochini Jews, many of whom immigrated to Israel in the 1950’s. As we create a traditional dish, Pesara Pappu Cabbage Fry, for the conference dinner, we will consider how Judaism has blended yet maintained itself within local Indian culture, from fasting to pilgrimages, and the caste structure. Using techniques learned from home cooks in India and an exploration of cardamom and spice plantations, join Alexis Daniels to bridge our global diaspora community through tastes and tales from the other side of the world.

  • Alexis Daniels, MS, OTR/L is the Director of the East Boston YMCA’s Teaching Kitchen, a founding member of Eastie Farm (East Boston’s first non-profit urban farm), and Director of Community Partnerships at Parachute Teachers. Alexis balances her time between classrooms, gardens, and the kitchen, cross-pollinating these beloved worlds. As a culinary teacher, she is motivated by the following questions: How do we prepare urban youth to address 21st century environmental and social problems, from food deserts to food waste? How do we engage children to be solutions-focused, systems-thinkers (and eaters)? Alexis takes “food for thought” literally, using cooking to increase scientific literacy and spark innovation.

Making Gardens Accessible: Inspiration to Connect Community and Jewish Tradition
Gardens serve many, and can be adapted to different people’s’ needs and abilities. Learn from examples of integrating sensory gardens into the community (schools, synagogues, camps, community gardens, hospitals, assisted living) to include people of all ages and abilities/disabilities. This workshop will discuss both therapeutic and practical aspects of garden and place-based learning. Utilizing both Jewish and universal values and resources, we’ll learn how to be inclusive in our horticulture practice, including the various calendars and holidays, and biblical guides for our plant choices.

  • Deborah Krause, B.S, HTM, has been the Horticulture Therapist and Coordinator of the Horticulture Center at Perkins School for the Blind in Watertown, for 35 years. She received her B.S. in Horticulture from Cornell University and is a Registered Horticulture Therapist Master. Deborah helped found the New England Horticulture Therapy Association and served as Board Member of the American Horticulture Therapy Association. She is the author of Designing Barrier Free Nature Areas by Cornell University and Horticulture Program by Perkins School for the Blind. As a consultant and curriculum writer, she has worked with hospitals, day schools, parks, and farms to develop accessible gardening programs. Her special interest is connecting horticulture and agriculture to Jewish values, holidays, and traditions.
  • Lisa Brukilacchio, OTR/L, M.Ed., has served for nine years as the Director of the Somerville Community Health Agenda at Cambridge Health Alliance, a partnership of the Alliance, the Somerville Health Department, and community organizations. In her food security efforts, she started a hospital garden, working in partnership with the psychiatry program and community volunteers. With a lifelong passion for creating healthier and more just communities for all, Lisa’s work has bridged the fields of clinical and community health care, environmental education and protection, organizational consultant, and formal educator. As a Somerville resident for over 30 years, Lisa is a founding member of the Somerville Community Growing Center and has served on numerous local boards.

Is there A Doctor In the House?
Is my School or Synagogue making me sick? Or harming the world in which we live? How can we advocate for more responsible and sustainable institutional choices? Learn about assessing your institution’s food and energy purchases and practices.

  • Rachel Aronson is the Sustainability and Community Engagement Fellow at Hazon, and a participant in the pilot year of the JOFEE (Jewish Outdoor, Food, Farming, and Environmental Education) Fellowship. She comes to Hazon and JOFEE from Resetting the Table, where she worked to open conversation about Israel across difference on college campuses. She has worked on a community farm, lived in an environmental co-op, and planted gardens on her fire escape to bridge her passions for building community and being around fresh-grown vegetables. Rachel is a former Emerson National Hunger Fellow and has a Bachelor of Arts in cultural anthropology and environmental studies from the University of Vermont.
  • Fred Davis is VP pro tem of the Jewish Climate Action Network where he develops and presents innovative, text-inspired programming to radically reduce carbon footprints. Since 1978, he has been professionally engaged, and an active organizer, in the energy-efficiency and renewables field. He is President of Fred Davis Corporation, an energy-efficient lighting products wholesaler. He has held numerous lay leadership positions at Temple Beth David in Westwood, as well as on local and national boards of the Northeast Sustainable Energy Association, Illuminating Engineering Society, JCRC Energy Committee, Urban Solar Energy Association, and Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston.
  • Dr. Hannah Gardener is an epidemiologist with a doctorate in public health from Harvard. Her academic work focuses on nutritional epidemiology, and how dietary habits relate to neurological and cardiovascular outcomes. She has worked as an epidemiologist for the University of Miami Medical School for 10 years. She also has a consulting practice called A Green Slate where she works with families and businesses to reduce their exposure to toxic chemicals in their living and working environments. Dr Gardener helps people make small, easy, and inexpensive changes in their homes, business, schools, and lifestyles to decrease exposure to common environmental contaminants.

Making Kosher Chicken – An Educational Shechita
*This session is two workshop times long, please attend both time slots and prepare to be outdoors*
Attendees will learn about the timeless Laws of Kosher slaughter, or Shechita, from their ancient origins to their modern day application, while respectfully witnessing Shechita of three chickens. Participants will have the opportunity to think deeply about the process of getting meat to their plate as well as to help in the process of transforming a live chicken into kosher meat ready for the Shabbat table by plucking feathers, soaking & salting. We will consider the whole course of an animal’s life and welfare.

  • Rabbi Zalman Krems is a California native and alumnus of the famed Yeshivas Techebin, Boston Kollel and the Ohr Lagolah Institute. He formerly served as the Kashrus Administrator of Oregon Kosher, Rabbi of Ahavas Torah in Eugene, Oregon, and a Rabbinic fellow of the Portland Kollel. Currently Rabbi Krems is the Executive Director of the Rabbinical Council of New England, and the head of its Kashrus department, KVH Kosher.                      
  • Rabbi Mayer Simcha Abramowitz is a native New Englander, born in Worcester currently living in New Haven. He is a graduate of the Rabbinical College of America, and has served as a Kosher inspector for major Kosher agencies for more than 20 years. He is a veteran second-generation shochet, with 29 years’ experience working under the most prominent rabbinical Supervisions. Rabbi Abramowitz is currently the Connecticut Region Kosher Supervisor for KVH Kosher.

Food Justice: Volunteering and Values
Both food and social action are meaningful or even essential expression of our Jewish values and identities. Bringing them together by volunteering on farms and in food pantries, soup kitchens, and other food spaces ties together two strong Jewish religious and cultural sensibilities. Learn some of the best practices in volunteering, as they relate to farming, food pantries, soup kitchens, and other food spaces, and understand them in the context of Jewish values and wisdom.

  • Sam Sittenfield is a Program Associate at Repair the World focusing on national training and education. Prior to his current post, he spent two years volunteering, recruiting volunteers, and facilitating volunteer experiences at community-based and food-oriented non-profits as a Food Justice Fellow with Repair the World in Pittsburgh and Brooklyn, NY. Sam studied Judaic studies and psychology at Tufts University.
  • Bernice Behar is the Director of JF&CS Family Table, the largest kosher food pantry in Eastern Massachusetts. Bernice joined JF&CS in 2010 having spent 24 years working in the financial industry. She is a member of the Agency Advisory Council (AAC) of the Greater Boston Food Bank and is President of the Board of Trustees of Temple Beth Shalom in Needham, MA.
  • Laurie “Duck” Caldwell is the Executive Director for Boston Area Gleaners.  She began working as the first employee of the organization in January 2010. Under her leadership, BAG has seen exponential growth: from 37,545 pounds gleaned in 2010 to 421,167 pounds gleaned in 2016. Over the same period, the Gleaners have moved from serving a handful of local pantries to working with major distribution partners such as the Greater Boston Food Bank and Food For Free. She is a carpenter by trade, has been a business owner, and has worked with farmers in VT and NH as a produce buyer for natural foods cooperatives across the northeast.

Jewish Commitment to Justice for Food Workers: The Harvard University Dining Hall Service Workers
Jewish tradition has much to say not only about the food that we eat, but also about how those who get the food to us deserve to be treated. These values played out on the ground this past October 2016, when after a three-week strike, Harvard’s dining workers successfully negotiated a new contract with the University, meeting all their demands. The New England Jewish Labor Committee was active in support of the striking workers. Come learn about how Jewish values about food extend to food workers.

  • Rosa Ines Rivera has worked for Harvard University Dining Services for 17 years. She played a leading role in the 22 day strike of Harvard food service workers in October 2016, including being arrested alongside 8 of her co-workers in a civil disobedience action that shut down Harvard Square. Rosa told the story of the challenges facing Harvard workers in an op-ed published in the New York Times and was profiled in the Chronicle of Higher Education’s “2016 Influence List.”
  • Don Siegel is the co-chair of the New England Jewish Labor Committee and is on the national board of the Jewish Labor Committee. An attorney whose practice focuses on labor issues, he has been a partner at Segal Roitman since 1978. Don has written and lectured extensively on topics of concern to the labor bar and to labor leaders. He has also received the Cushing-Gavin award as an outstanding union attorney and the Massachusetts AFL-CIO Merit Award. Don has been named a Massachusetts Super Lawyer numerous times, and has been listed in Boston’s Best Lawyers.
  • Grace Evans is a sophomore at Harvard College originally from Providence. On campus, Grace is the New England Jewish Labor Committee Campus Initiative fellow, a member of the Student Labor Action Movement, and a leader of the Progressive Jewish Alliance. During the Harvard dining workers’ strike, Grace helped organize students in support of dining hall workers, particularly within the Jewish community at Harvard Hillel. Grace remains interested in the intersection of faith identity and social justice, and is now organizing the Harvard Jewish community around allyship to immigrant communities.

 

4:15-5:30 WORKSHOP BLOCK THREE

Bread of Affliction: Matzah, Hunger, and Poverty       
Matzah is the bread of our affliction, but not just because it makes us constipated for one week of the year. It is the symbol of the Israelites’ hasty exit from Egypt, when they could not afford the time to prepare a nutritious meal for themselves. What can this tale from the exodus from Egypt teach us about food insecurity today? What are the challenges that low income communities face in accessing and preparing healthy, nutritious foods? Participants will leave with tools to start a conversation about matzah, poverty, and hunger at their seder.

  • Sam Sittenfield is a Program Associate at Repair the World focusing on national training and education. Prior to his current post, he spent two years volunteering, recruiting volunteers, and facilitating volunteer experiences at community-based and food-oriented non-profits as a Food Justice Fellow with Repair the World in Pittsburgh and Brooklyn, NY. Sam studied Judaic studies and psychology at Tufts University.                  
  • Rachel Aronson is the Sustainability and Community Engagement Fellow at Hazon, and a participant in the pilot year of the JOFEE (Jewish Outdoor, Food, Farming, and Environmental Education) Fellowship. She comes to Hazon and JOFEE from Resetting the Table, where she worked to open conversation about Israel across difference on college campuses. She has worked on a community farm, lived in an environmental co-op, and planted gardens on her fire escape to bridge her passions for building community and being around fresh-grown vegetables. Rachel is a former Emerson National Hunger Fellow and has a Bachelor of Arts in cultural anthropology and environmental studies from the University of Vermont.

Shakin’ Shakshuka  *COOKING*
Join Chef Ari Kendall, owner of the ChikChak food truck, to explore Mediterranean flavors through the humble dish of Shakshuka. Whether you fancy yourself a regular Dr. Shakshuka or you think it sounds like the newest dance craze, you’ll be delighted to learn new cooking techniques and ways to make Shakshuka your very own. See the difference farm fresh eggs make to this delicious dish thanks to The Farm School. Workshop will include demonstration and hands-on food preparation as you work together to prepare part of our meal for the conference dinner.

  • Chef Ari Kendall grew up in Sharon, MA and is a proud member of the Gann Academy class of ’07. Before completing his culinary degree at Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts in Boston, he spent time studying hospitality in Israel. After culinary school, Chef Ari honed his craft working at several restaurants and catering companies in Boston including East Coast Grill, Catering by Andrew, and Barcelona Wine Bar. Two years ago, he ventured out on his own and now works as the Chef and Owner of Chik Chak Food Truck, serving traditional Mediterrean cuisine all over New England. Look for him and his truck on the streets of Boston, and at festivals in Connecticut, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Maine and Western Massachusetts. 

Powering Your Plate for Climate, Health and Animals: Jewish Values and Personal Food Choices
How can Jewish ethics help us address our food choices in light of health, environment, and 21st century industrial agriculture? In this session, you’ll hear from a expert in sustainability and the environment, a rabbi chef, and a Jewish vegan farmer who will enlighten us on recent trends and new solutions. 

  • Rabbi Cherina Eisenberg, representing Jewish Veg, was ordained by ALEPH: Alliance for Jewish Renewal and is a certified chef from the Natural Gourmet Institute, specializing in vibrant plant-based cuisine fresh from the farmer’s market. As a former vegetarian cooking columnist, Rabbi Cherina serves as cantorial soloist and adult educator at Temple Sinai in Brookline. With a M.A. in Jewish Education from the Jewish Theological Seminary, Rabbi Cherina teaches across the country, inspiring Jews of all ages to embrace the beauty of Judaism through practical spirituality infused with the healing, creative, and culinary arts.
  • David Havelick has a Masters degree in Sustainability and Environmental Management from the Harvard Extension School. In July 2016 he started as a Sustainability Manager in Harvard’s Office for Sustainability and is now leading their living laboratory initiative and the creation of sustainable and healthful food standards for the university. He is the staff advisor for the newly formed Harvard Vegan Society. David is also a board member of the Boston Vegetarian Society and a key organizer of the annual two-day Boston Veg Food Fest.
  • Noah Weinberg is an educator, song leader, and aspiring pursuer of peace (rodef shalom). His passion for Jewish food, farming and animal welfare comes from his experiences as an Adamah fellow, completing a Permaculture Design Course at Kibbutz Lotan, and presenting for the Jewish Initiative for Animals (JIFA). He is close to completing his studies at Tufts University in Peace and Justice Studies, and Education. This year he is interning at Gann Academy, working at the intersection of spirituality and social justice, and will be leading a “Food Justice and Identity” themed “Exploration Week” in the spring.

Health Aging through community collaboration
Join a conversation about how communities can support healthy aging among the seniors in their midst. Hear examples of public and private programs that exist, and some of the challenges and benefits of various models. Resources will be shared, as well as opportunity to discuss and brainstorm specifics for different communities.

  • Syrah McGivern is the Mass in Motion Coordinator for the City of Medford. In that capacity she works with the Medford Farmers Market, New Entry Sustainable Farming Project, The Medford Community Garden initiative, Walk Medford and others to long lasting changes related to nutrition and physical activity among Seniors.
  • Walter Leutz, M.S.W., Ph.D.  Dr. Leutz is a Professor in the Heller School for Social Policy and Research at Brandeis University. He recently participated in the formation of the Massachusetts Collaborative for Healthy Aging.  During a sabbatical in 2015 he led a participatory action research study of health aging in Waltham and Greenfield MA, which has led to The Waltham Connections to Healthy Aging project.  Overall, his work reflects intimate understanding of the needs of vulnerable adults and the care systems that serve them.

Obtaining Stakeholder Buy-In on Sustainability Initiatives
Colleges and educational institutions procure and serve massive amounts of food and produce massive amounts of waste, but shifting to better practices requires both shifts in institutional process as well as individual behavior  modification. Hear from sustainability professionals and a Hillel rabbi about how they have created social norms about behaviors, shifted operational processes, and used programming to influence students to be conscious and mindful of their actions.

  • Natalie Berland grew up in Milwaukee with an appreciation for nature and environmentalism. She is currently the Assistant Director of Sustainability at Bentley University and is a board member with the Waltham Land Trust; she has been involved with the Transition Movement in the past. She has her Masters in International Environmental Policy from the Middlebury Institute of International Studies in Monterey, CA. Natalie enjoys hiking, biking, camping and gardening.
  • Shoshana Blank is the Education and Outreach Program Administrator at Tufts University’s Office of Sustainability. Prior to Tufts, she worked at the Sustainable Endowments Institute, where she consulted with universities and cities on financing their energy efficiency projects through green revolving funds. Shoshana conducted research on air quality from wood-burning cookstoves in an Indian village as part of a Fulbright grant. Shoshana graduated from St. Olaf College in 2010 with majors in Biology and Environmental Studies. She enjoys gardening, cooking and eating local foods, ice cream, and environmental activism.
  • Rabbi Jeffrey Foust – bio coming soon!

Cooking Jew-ish: Mixing Tradition and Cultures in the Kitchen 

When was the last time you ate a bowl of cholent or chamin on Shabbat? Have many recipes of traditional Jewish cuisine been relegated to the frayed brown pages in old Kosher cookbooks for good?  Has traditional Jewish food evolved over time? Or is Jewish cuisine following trends in popular cuisine becoming adapted for the different lifestyles food choices? Discover what’s happening in the Food scene and how this speaks to Jewish culture in general.

  • Izzy Darby– Izzy is a vegan food blogger at Veganizzm.com, where she strives to make plant-based eating approachable and fun. She enjoys cooking up modern takes on Jewish classics. Izzy works at America’s Test Kitchen and is a contributor to The Nosher. Izzy can be found on Instagram and Twitter @veganizzm.
  • Dr. Ellen Rovner– is a cultural anthropologist who studies the intersection of gender, class, food, and ethnicity.  She is an adjunct professor at Boston University, teaching in the Masters in Liberal Arts and Gastronomy program. Ellen regards research as a tool for social action and as such she is currently exploring how women’s embodied food practices and beliefs can be used to empower and further cross-cultural understandings between socially marginalized immigrant Latinas and older, Jewish women in Chelsea, MA. een socially marginalized immigrant Latinas and older, Jewish women in Chelsea, MA. She has published essays on how gender roles construct food practices to shape individual and collective identities, and has presented professional talks on issues concerning changing notions of home, feminism, and food.
  • Karl Schatz lives with his wife Margaret, and their three daughters on Ten Apple Farm where they lead goat hikes, raise chickens, sheep, goats, and pigs!, tend a large garden and small orchard, make cheese and live agriculturally and Jewishly. He is on the board of Levey Day School, Maine’s only Jewish Day School, and together with Margaret, created the school’s signature food and fundraising event, the Holy Smokes! Kosher BBQ, now in its 4th year. He is the Director of Aurora Photos, an international stock photography agency based in Portland, Maine.